Risk Predictions
Be afraid to try new things! (Advice from author of best-selling self-help books to his son)

Be afraid to try new things! (Advice from author of best-selling self-help books to his son)

The STEM Crisis Is a Myth. - IEEE Spectrum:
I don’t have enough data to comment whether the STEM shortage is true, but I certainly agree with the author on broader STEM education. STEM education for all public, not necessarily, career in STEM.

 ”A broader view, I and many others would argue, is that everyone needs a solid grounding in science, engineering, and math. In that sense, there is indeed a shortage—a STEM knowledge shortage. To fill that shortage, you don’t necessarily need a college or university degree in a STEM discipline, but you do need to learn those subjects, and learn them well, from childhood until you head off to college or get a job. Improving everyone’s STEM skills would clearly be good for the workforce and for people’s employment prospects, for public policy debates, and for everyday tasks like balancing checkbooks and calculating risks. And, of course, when science, math, and engineering are taught well, they engage students’ intellectual curiosity about the world and how it works.”
iloveoldmagazines:

Cincinnati
1977 Vol. 10, No. 10

iloveoldmagazines:

Cincinnati

1977 Vol. 10, No. 10

Don’t be so quick to place politicians’ views of “national interests” above the mood of the public — The Monkey Cage

Don’t be so quick to place politicians’ views of “national interests” above the mood of the public — The Monkey Cage:
Political scientist Benjamin Page wrote a few years ago, there are systematic differences between the attitudes of the public and of U.S. foreign policy elites:
"Most gaps between citizens and officials appear to have more to do with differing values and interests than with differing levels of information and expertise. To the extent that this is true and that Americans’ collective policy preferences are coherent and reflective of the best available information, there would seem to be a strong argument, based on democratic theory, that policy makers should pay more heed to the public’s wishes."
Interesting, and it is supported by data. Still thinking when a society in which people pay far more attention to iPhones and MTV than foreign policy, why collective policy preferences would be better. Maybe distorted personal interest is more vicious than lack of knowledge?
Shameless Samsung | stratēchery by Ben Thompson

Via RiskPredictions

Shameless Samsung | stratēchery by Ben Thompson:

"Every pre-iPhone phone maker is irrelevant, if they even exist, except for Samsung, who is thriving. Samsung the copycat was smart enough to realize they needed to change, and quickly, and so they did.
Or maybe it wasn’t being smart. Maybe it was simply not caring what anyone else thought about them, their strategy, or their inspiration. Most successful companies, including Apple, including Google, seem remarkably capable of ignoring the naysayers and simply doing what is right for their company. In the case of smartphones, why wouldn’t you copy the iPhone? Nokia refused and look where that got them!”